Community Information

The cities and towns that I serve are listed below. If you would like to find out about the latest homes that have become available in these communities, please contact me at (888) 220-2820 or you can setup a Private Search!

Click on underlined cities to view a description of the city.

Alameda
Alamo
Albany
Antioch
Bay Point
Bethel Is/Byron/Knightsen
Blackhawk
Brentwood
Castro Valley
Clayton
Concord
Crockett/Port Costa
Danville
Diablo
Discovery Bay
Dublin
El Sobrante
El Sobrante
Emeryville
Fremont
Hayward
Lafayette
Lake County
Lake Tahoe
Livermore
Manteca
Marin County
Martinez
Mendocino County
Modesto
Moraga/Canyon
Napa County
Newark
Oakland
Oakley
Orinda
Other County/Out of State
Pacheco
Piedmont
Pinole
Pittsburg
Pleasant Hill
Pleasanton
Rodeo
Rossmoor
Sacramento County
San Francisco County
San Joaquin County
San Leandro
San Lorenzo
San Mateo County
San Ramon
Santa Clara County
Solano County
Sonoma County
Stanislaus County
Sunol
Tracy
Union City
Walnut Creek
 
Alameda TOP OF PAGE

Neighborhoods defined by their period of development (none of which is recent) make central Alameda truly charming and unique. Quintessential Queen Anne cottages and California craftsman bungalows abound and yet every street seems to be completely different from the last one.

Alameda yet this area is undergoing huge changes. Former military facilities are being leased to a variety of commercial/industrial enterprises, hundreds of new homes are on the drawing board, environmental clean up is under way, a wildlife sanctuary is being preserved, and we've got some land left that could be a private air strip, a golf course, or who knows what. The development of this area is having a profoundly positive effect on the whole city.

 
Alamo TOP OF PAGE

Alamo is an unincorporated community within the Danville area that features higher priced homes in a more rural setting than Danville or San Ramon. With a population of over 12,000 and growing, the real estate market in Alamo and the surrounding areas is characterized by both growth and stability. The area has an increasingly diverse employment base in businesses such as transportation, communication and finance. Public schools rank among the best in the state as there is a strong emphasis on quality education in the area. There are also excellent private and parochial schools. These as well as many other qualities and amenities make Alamo a wonderful community in which to live.

 
Antioch TOP OF PAGE

Population: 62,195

Though over 115 years old, Antioch is very much a new city, it is one of the fastest growing cities in Contra Costa County. Homes in the affordable price range are going up by the thousands, especially in the south east section. Several new schools are being built to accommodate this fast growing community. Downtown Antioch has a new marina, a promenade, restaurants, and a fish pier and will probably see more water front improvements. Commuting is improving in the 1990’s, BART (Bay Area Rapid transit) wilt be extended to the East County in the very near future. Antioch as many clubs, parks and outdoor activities like fishing, boating and water skiing.

 
Bay Point TOP OF PAGE

Population: 17,453

Bay Point is located in the northeasterly end of the Diablo Valley in an area generally referred to as Central Contra Costa County. In It’s central location, Bay Point is located approximately 30 mile east of San Francisco. Commute time on the freeway system to Oakland and San Francisco ranges from 30 to 60 minutes, and now that BART is beginning operations of their station in Bay Point, commute time from Bay Point should be 25 to 40 minutes away by rail. Bay Point once considered part of Pittsburgh, is now an independent, unincorporated area of the County and within the redevelopment agency area of responsibility for the County Bay Point has opportunities abounding and can be seen as one of the foremost areas for business as well as residential development into the next century.

 
Bethel Is/Byron/Knightsen TOP OF PAGE

Berkeley California is one of the most unique and exciting cities in the world. Because of its outstanding and diverse cultural history, unique geography, and steadily growing economy, Berkeley continues to attract intellectuals, artists, entrepreneurs, and world travelers, as it has for decades.

Berkeley natives have lived among the many charms of this city by the bay since long before the University of California Free Speech Movement gave Berkeley its international notoriety in the 1960's. Today, few places on earth celebrate their rich, culturally diverse population with Berkeley's wide variety of year-round cultural activities. Another aspect of Berkeley's diversity and appeal is its close physical proximity to the general San Francisco bay area and to the greater Northern California region. Berkeley is at the geographic center of the east bay area and is just a short, beautiful drive over either of our two world class bridges connecting us to San Francisco and Marin counties.

Berkeley has long been at the forefront of public education and modern education reform. The Berkeley Unified School District benefits enormously by its association and its proximity to the University of California at Berkeley. The effect of this association is evident in the secondary schools all the way down to the primary grades. The university and the public school system offer unparalleled access to world class education, general employment opportunities, and athletic facilities and events.

Berkeley is one of the few cities in the world which offers a true variety of micro climates, ranging from our mild bay climate to the beautiful sunny hills with their breathtaking views of the entire San Francisco bay area. Berkeley is also home to numerous lush, beautifully preserved park areas featuring a broad scope of recreational facilities, family activities, and serene, undisturbed settings. Berkeley's favorable year-round climate, its unique hills overlooking the beautiful bay, and its central location in the northern California region make Berkeley one of the most sought after housing markets in the country.

 
Blackhawk TOP OF PAGE

Population: 6,199

Affluent village with condos and custom homes near Danville. There are 18-hole golf courses, 20 lighted tennis courts, a 25 acre sports complex, and many clubs and social activities- Blackhawk Plaza, a museum, shops, restaurants and supermarkets are all nearby. Security gates surround the residential area. A picturesque location with rolling hills and Mount Diablo in the background.

 
Brentwood TOP OF PAGE

Population: 10,488

A farm town turning into a bedroom community with a population increase of 48% in the last decade. It is very close to the Delta for boating, fishing and water sports. Many come for fruits and vegetables, as the area is full of orchards. In the summer months, thousands come out to pick and taste the delicious white peaches. Hot in the summer and cool in the winter, with great view of Mount Diablo. Brentwood is an enjoyable and affordable home area.

 
Castro Valley TOP OF PAGE

Nestled in a quiet valley against tree covered rolling hills, Castro Valley businesses, residents, and visitors enjoy a "rural" atmosphere at the hub of California's economical, cultural, and recreational heartland. This steadily growing community, 13 miles south of Oakland and 27 miles southeast of San Francisco, boasts such natural amenities as an extensively developed park system, swimming lagoon, 315 acre lake, and a beautiful 18 hole golf course

 
Clayton TOP OF PAGE

Population: 8,6O0

Clayton is a charming and rustic city nestled amidst the calm of the Mount Diablo region. Even though 1500 new homes, duets, and townhouses have emerged, along with the renowned Oakhurst Country Club, Clayton has managed to keep it’s quaintness and rural, independent character. You will still see horses grazing here and there, and neighbors getting together for local events, such as the annual Fourth of July parade. Clayton is mainly a community where people come home from work to relax, or for people who like to be in touch with nature.

 
Concord TOP OF PAGE

Population: 111,348

Contra Costa’s most populous city is home to Buchanan Airport, Concord Pavilion, the Naval Weapons Stations, the giant Sun Valley Shopping Mall, and Water World USA, Concord’s newest attraction. Here you will find the Blue Devils Marching Band (one of the best in the nation), 19 parks, 12 playgrounds and a golf and community center. All these features helped make Concord place in the top twelve cities nationwide for City Livability Award. Once considered nothing more that a bedroom community, Concord has come into It’s own as a business center. Housing ranges from executive homes to apartments. Depending upon your needs, you can find a high quality of living here. Many of the newer developments include their own recreational facilities. Hiking and jogging trails abound in Concord.

 
Danville TOP OF PAGE

Population: 31,306

This is the town in the middle of the San Ramon Valley. It’s a prestigious address that is attracting many new professionals. Downtown Danville is quaint with its old western motif, and offers a full range of shopping facilities. Some older homes and estates are available, but most homes are in the recently constructed housing tract and are fairly expensively priced. Danville presents itself as charming, with a real feeling of the past. A tree lighting ceremony at Christmas, a baseball team that won the 1991 Little League title and many fine restaurants (including Bridges, the restaurant seen in the movie Ms. Doubtfire) and shops make Danville a very desired little community.

 
Diablo TOP OF PAGE

Diablo lies in the Mount Diablo foothills to the east of Danville. Formerly a summer and weekend getaway, Diablo features country club living for the luxury minded, executive class who commute to offices in the Surrounding area. Diablo was a sporting farm at the turn of the century, complete with race track and casino. With extensive renovation the Clubhouse became the Diablo Country Club, which offers swimming, tennis and an 18-hole golf course.

 
Discovery Bay TOP OF PAGE

Population: 5,351

A water oriented development on the eastern border of Contra Costa with many luxurious homes. Fishing, boating, water sports and tennis are some of the activities you may enjoy here. A golf course and country club also make Discovery Bay very appealing. It’s a very active and fun outdoor community. Discovery Bay is becoming a self-serving community offering marina-type living.

 
Dublin TOP OF PAGE

It was 1834 when Dublin started as a community, it was known as Amador's Ranch because Jose Marie Amador built his ranch and buildings on the corner of Dublin Blvd. and San Ramon Road next to the Alamilla Springs. It was a community of about 100 people, mainly Indian, which worked in the factory Manufacturing soap, blankets, shoes, and leather goods for ranch use and for trade. The ranch was an 18,000-acre land grant given to Jose Marie Amador for his years of service as a soldier and Administrator of Mission San Jose.

The land raised cattle, sheep, and food for the residents. The ranch was very prosperous until gold was discovered in 1849. Ranch workers left for the gold fields and the ranch was neglected. In 1852 Amador began selling his land to Americans who wanted to farm. Michael Murray and Jeremiah Fallon, by way of New York, New Orleans and Mission San Jose, purchased 1,000 acres of what is now Dublin and Stoneridge, built homes and started farming.

Dublin's location at the intersection of two major stagecoach routes and later two major freeways has sustained and at times, spurred its growth as a residential and business community from early days. In the 1960's, the San Ramon Village development brought Dublin into the modern era. The '70's and '80's saw continued growth and many new businesses and new housing. Now Dublin is a quaint, yet modern community which has not lost the imprints of it’s western pioneering past, with it’s rich history still quietly displaying it’s self in the traces of store fronts and homes, the quietude of the beautiful landscapes, and the friendly and easygoing manner of the people who work and play in this community.

Ever-growing it is still the type of city where education is a priority, where one can get to know one’s neighbors and feel proud of the community leaders. It has a small town feel with all a modern cities conveniences, and luxuries.

There are many strong local businesses and opportunities, but Dublin is also a great place to raise a family or find a reprieve from work with it’s many amenities such as 56 acres of developed parkland including 5 neighborhood parks, one community park and community center, a swim center, an outdoor sports complex, a senior center and a heritage center. For those who still want to experience the city life but don’t want to live there, the city of Dublin is convenient to San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose. With major business parks, shopping centers, and golf courses and close to California's oldest wine growing region, the Livermore Valley, this city truly offers something for everyone.

 
El Sobrante TOP OF PAGE

El Sobrante is a scenic valley with great views from the hills and is the site of much recent residential development at affordable prices. Compared to areas in the East County, El Sobrante's a reasonably good commute. It is only 14 miles from the Bay Bridge toll plaza, and San Pablo Dam Road suds directly to and from Central Contra Costa County.

 
El Sobrante TOP OF PAGE

Richmond is the County’s second largest city and, in the past few years new and upscale developments have sprung up, many in rural areas offering a county flavor. Due to its pleasant climate and close proximity to both Highway 24 and Interstate 80 leading into metropolitan San Francisco, Richmond and its surrounding suburban areas are fast becoming an appealing, affordable alternative to commuters and new home buyers.

 
Fremont TOP OF PAGE

Located on the southeast side of the San Francisco Bay, Fremont is a city of over 208,000 people with an area of 92 square miles, making it the fourth most populous city in the Bay Area and California's fifth largest city in area. With its moderate climate and its proximity to major universities, shopping areas, recreational and cultural activities, employment centers, major airports, and the Bay Area Rapid Transit system, Fremont captures metropolitan living at its best.

The Fremont area was first settled with the establishment of Mission San Jose by the Spanish. In the mid-1840's, John C. Fremont mapped a trail through Mission Pass to provide access for American settlers into the southeastern San Francisco Bay Area. In 1853, Washington Township was established, taking in the communities of Mission San Jose, Centerville, Niles, Irvington, and Warm Springs. On January 23, 1956, these communities joined together to form the City of Fremont.

From its incorporation in 1956, Fremont grew from a collection of farm based communities with a population of about 26,000. With the guidance of an award winning general plan, Fremont has evolved into a community of wide landscaped streets, 46 city parks, the San Francisco National Wildlife Refuge, Coyote Hills Regional Park, and the unique Ardenwood Farm Historical Park. With a vibrant commercial/industrial sector, Fremont is home to the New United Motor Manufacturing plant (NUMMI), a joint venture between General Motors and Toyota, producing Toyota Tacoma pickup trucks, the Geo Prizm, and the Toyota Corolla.

As a part of the world famous Silicon Valley, Fremont also is proud to be home to Lam Research, LSI Logic/Micronics Computers, Logitech, and HMT Technology as well as many smaller but rapidly growing technology companies.

Long recognized as an ethnically and culturally diverse family oriented community, Fremont boasts a crime rate consistently the lowest or near the lowest of the country's 100 largest cities. While not immune to the problems of the larger urban area, Fremont is fortunate to draw on the creative resources of an involved citizenry and robust local government institutions in addressing them.

 
Hayward TOP OF PAGE

Hayward is located on the east shore of the San Francisco Bay, 25 miles southeast of San Francisco, 14 miles south of Oakland, 26 miles north of San Jose, and 10 miles west of the Livermore Valley. The city encompasses 61 square miles ranging from the shore of the Bay eastward to the southern Oakland-Berkeley Hills.

Hayward has a culturally and economically diverse population of 123,000 and their City Government was incorporated in 1876 and is a full service City. The City operates under the Council-Manager form of government with a City Council made up of seven members (including the Mayor) elected at-large for four year terms

Hayward was founded in 1852 by William Hayward, who purchased 40 acres of land encompassing what is now Downtown Hayward. The early Hayward community, with its location at the crossroads of commerce, its temperate climate, and its fertile soil, consisted of a stage coach stop, post office, general trading store, a dairy farm, and one of the area's finest hotel resorts. Hayward experienced tremendous growth during the post-war years, and since the 1960's has grown at a steady and managed pace.

Downtown Hayward has a pedestrian-friendly downtown comprised of two story buildings with a mix of housing, retail shops, offices, and restaurants -- and parking is free! Downtown is the site of the Saturday Farmer's Market and celebrations throughout the year including the Blues and Brew, Celebration of Nations, and Art and Wine Festivals. The City is developing a Civic Center Complex with government offices in City Hall, retail stores, and condominiums adjacent to the downtown BART station. Across from the Civic Center, 83 townhomes, the first phase of 250 new residences, have been built.

Hayward is home to a California State University campus, Chabot Community College. Local technical and business colleges provide training programs designed to equip students with practical job skills. The vast educational and research resources of University of California campuses in Berkeley, and Stanford University

Hayward boasts a variety of recreational and cultural attractions -- parks, arts groups and art enrichment opportunities, historical roots and resources -- which help make Hayward a good place to live as well as a good place to work. The Shoreline Interpretive Center and the Japanese Garden are unique to Hayward. We have many parks, swim centers, tennis courts, an arts center, performance theaters, a rodeo arena, a nature center, and a greenbelt hiking trail. Skywest, Hayward's professionally rated 18-hole golf course, is "one of the best municipal golf courses in the East Bay" according to the San Francisco Business Times. And we have restaurants to satisfy every taste! There is lots to see and do in Hayward.

Livermoore

Founded in 1869, Livermore is located in the Tri-Valley region East of San Francisco on Interstate 580 providing easy access to both the Central Valley and San Francisco Bay metropolitan area.

Livermore is the epitome of California living with its urban amenities and relaxed lifestyle. Surrounded by vineyards and golden hillsides, yet less than an hour from San Francisco - Livermore is ideally located for trips to the mountains or the ocean. Great hospitality, community spirit, and a sense of history with a tendency towards the futuristic - this is the image of California and an essential part of Livermore's appeal.

San Leandro

San Leandro is a friendly and diverse City with a colorful heritage and numerous cultural amenities including a 450-berth Marina, two golf courses and a large community library center. Discovered in 1772 by a Spanish explorer, San Leandro became famous during the late 1800s and early 1900s for its delicious cherries. In 1909, to celebrate the abundant cherry harvest, San Leandro held its first Cherry Festival, an event which was so successful, it is still celebrated today.

In addition to the Cherry Festival, San Leandro is also well-known for its quiet, well-defined neighborhoods full of charming and unique older houses on tree-lined streets. San Leandro residents are proud of both their neighborhoods and their City which can be seen in their active involvement in the City .s numerous neighborhood and homeowner .s associations. San Leandro .s temperate weather also makes it an excellent place for outdoor recreation. With an average temperature of 62 degrees and average rainfall of 19 inches per year, outdoor activity at the one of the many City parks is possible all year round.

Freemont

Located on the southeast side of the San Francisco Bay, Fremont is a city of over 208,000 people with an area of 92 square miles, making it the fourth most populous city in the Bay Area and California's fifth largest city in area. With its moderate climate and its proximity to major universities, shopping areas, recreational and cultural activities, employment centers, major airports, and the Bay Area Rapid Transit system, Fremont captures metropolitan living at its best.

The Fremont area was first settled with the establishment of Mission San Jose by the Spanish. In the mid-1840's, John C. Fremont mapped a trail through Mission Pass to provide access for American settlers into the southeastern San Francisco Bay Area. In 1853, Washington Township was established, taking in the communities of Mission San Jose, Centerville, Niles, Irvington, and Warm Springs. On January 23, 1956, these communities joined together to form the City of Fremont.

From its incorporation in 1956, Fremont grew from a collection of farm based communities with a population of about 26,000. With the guidance of an award winning general plan, Fremont has evolved into a community of wide landscaped streets, 46 city parks, the San Francisco National Wildlife Refuge, Coyote Hills Regional Park, and the unique Ardenwood Farm Historical Park. With a vibrant commercial/industrial sector, Fremont is home to the New United Motor Manufacturing plant (NUMMI), a joint venture between General Motors and Toyota, producing Toyota Tacoma pickup trucks, the Geo Prizm, and the Toyota Corolla.

As a part of the world famous Silicon Valley, Fremont also is proud to be home to Lam Research, LSI Logic/Micronics Computers, Logitech, and HMT Technology as well as many smaller but rapidly growing technology companies.

Long recognized as an ethnically and culturally diverse family oriented community, Fremont boasts a crime rate consistently the lowest or near the lowest of the country's 100 largest cities. While not immune to the problems of the larger urban area, Fremont is fortunate to draw on the creative resources of an involved citizenry and robust local government institutions in addressing them.

 
Lafayette TOP OF PAGE

Population: 23,501

Lafayette is a prestigious and pretty town with much appeal to the affluent with many custom homes, quite a few built on the hills to take in views of the countryside. There are some new housing, however, the community is primarily composed of mature homes in established neighborhoods. Outdoor recreation, fishing, boating, hiking, horse and walking trails and swimming are within minutes from any neighborhood.

 
Lake County TOP OF PAGE

Lake County is conveniently located about two hours driving time from both the San Francisco Bay Area and the Sacramento metropolitan area. Approximately 110 road miles north of San Francisco, 100 road miles northwest of Sacramento and 80 miles east of the Pacific Coast, Lake County is bordered by Napa, Sonoma, Mendocino, Glenn, Colusa and Yolo Counties.

The region enjoys year-round moderate temperatures and rainfall, as well as excellent air quality (the cleanest in the state!). Average temperatures range from a low of 32 degrees and a high of 60 degrees during the months of January through March, to a low of 57 degrees and high of 95 degrees July through September. The average yearly rainfall measures 25 inches in the Clear Lake basin to almost 60 inches in the Cobb Mountain area.

(County) Naturally endowed with scenic mountains, the largest natural fresh water lake in California, several other lakes and reservoirs and forestlands teeming with wildlife, Lake County covers an area of 803,840 acres or 1,261 square miles. Clear Lake is California's largest natural lake with 43,785 surface acres and is a capacity of 1,155,000 acre feet, and is possibly North America's oldest lake, dating back some 2.5 million years. The lake elevation is 1,326 feet, has depths up to 60 feet with an average of 28 feet, an average temperature of 61 degrees, infrequent fog and the prevailing winds are mild westerlies. Fishing season is 365 days a year with species including bass, catfish, crappie and bluegill (the lake record bass is 17.52 lbs.)

The Department of Finance estimates 55,600 people reside in Lake County, with 12,400 living in the City of Clearlake, 4,720 living in the City of Lakeport and 39,350 living in the unincorporated areas of the county.

General Law governs Lake County. A five person Board of Supervisors oversees the workings of the county government offices. The City of Lakeport, on the west shore of Clear Lake, is the county seat and the oldest (incorporated in 1888) of the two cities. The city of Clearlake, on the south shore of Clear Lake, was incorporated in 1980.

Lake County has an average labor force (in 1994) of approximately 23,980, with 21,170 employed and 2,810 unemployed for an average unemployment rate of 11.7%.

The county's total number of homes exceeds 31,600 as of January 1, 1996 with 19,245 single-family detached units, 1,952 multi-family units and approximately 10,416 mobile homes.

There are twelve elementary schools, five middle schools, six high schools, five continuation high schools and one independent study school in seven school districts in Lake County. The Lake County Office of Education oversees the seven districts. There are also two community colleges - Mendocino College and Yuba College - that offer classes at their centers located in Lakeport and Clearlake, respectively.

 
Livermore TOP OF PAGE

Founded in 1869, Livermore is located in the Tri-Valley region East of San Francisco on Interstate 580 providing easy access to both the Central Valley and San Francisco Bay metropolitan area.

Livermore is the epitome of California living with its urban amenities and relaxed lifestyle. Surrounded by vineyards and golden hillsides, yet less than an hour from San Francisco - Livermore is ideally located for trips to the mountains or the ocean. Great hospitality, community spirit, and a sense of history with a tendency towards the futuristic - this is the image of California and an essential part of Livermore's appeal.

 
Manteca TOP OF PAGE

Welcome to the setting of Manteca. With collections of distinctive single-family homes offers unparalleled features and options that are sure to suit the most discerning tastes. This city has a very rural feel with it’s almond orchards and vineyards, yet one is always only minutes from shopping in the heart of Manteca. Close to Highways 120, 99, and Interstate 5. The nearby Altamont Commuter Express train station provides a convenient commute to the Tri-Valley, Silicon Valley, and the Bay Area. With Manteca's growing presence as a regional job center, the newly opened Spreckels Business Park and the planned Tara Industrial Park make this a city worth considering.

 
Marin County TOP OF PAGE

Marin City sprang up almost overnight in 1942 as a World War II "boom town" that provided housing for workers at Marinship, the bustling Sausalito shipyard that built 93 Liberty ships for the war effort. In his novel, "On the Road," Jack Kerouac described Marin City as "the only community in America where whites and Negroes lived together voluntarily; and that was so, and so wild and joyous a place I've never seen since." In the late 1950s, the county Housing Authority took over, building public housing apartments, primarily for low-income shipyard workers who stayed in the area. Later, the ridge overlooking the community was developed with the upscale Headlands condominiums and some apartments, providing the region with a mix of lifestyles. Today, Marin City enjoys an economic rebirth with construction of the new Marin City USA shopping complex, as well as new housing development. The school system has become a concern for many as officials work to improve test scores and discipline.

In addition to public housing and apartments, as well as the Headlands condominiums, new housing is rising: The Marin City USA project will provide 255 apartments, 103 of which will rent for below-market rates and 85 townhouses, including 34 for low and moderate-income buyers.

The Sausalito School District, which serves the area, offers Bayside-Martin Luther King Elementary and North Bay Elementary, an alternative school. Concern about the quality of local educational programs, spurred by issues including poor test scores, has generated political upheaval and a reform movement. Students are part of the Tamalpais Union High School system.

Marin City is served by a full schedule of public transportation programs, with bus transit getting residents to downtown San Francisco in less than an hour during the heavy morning commute.

 
Martinez TOP OF PAGE

Population: 31,505

The county seat is located along the Carquinez Strait and extending to Pleasant Hill. Martinez can be described as a governmental and institutional community. The dozens of parks, bocce ball at the marina and the Shore Road to Crockett for cyclists are some of the activities people there enjoy. Good restaurants and tight spots add a fun feeling to the town. Martinez is cooled with breezes from the Strait House and prices vary from moderate to high depending on the area and the view. Martinez, with its small town charm, is a desirable place to live.

 
Mendocino County TOP OF PAGE

Our quaint little village of around 1,000 residents boasts more artists and writers per capita than any other place in the U.S. Surrounded by dramatic cliffs, abundant and colorful natural flora, redwood trees and unexpected coves, a serene and beautiful place to raise children, retire or simply for a vacation.

 
Modesto TOP OF PAGE

A community proud of its vibrant citizenry, great traditions, educational opportunities, and multicultural lifestyles, Modesto is twice-blessed with mild weather year-round and some of the world's richest soil.

Part of California's fertile Central Valley, which stretches 300 miles through the center of the state, Modesto offers the diversity and facilities of a metropolitan city, but still maintains an atmosphere of old-fashioned hospitality. With a population exceeding 180,000, it is the largest city and the seat of Stanislaus County.

Centrally located on Highway 99, Modesto is easily accessible from throughout California. West of the valley and over the coastal mountain range lies the San Francisco Bay Area, a 90-minute drive from Modesto. Eastward are the foothills that house the famed Mother Lode gold country and lead to the majestic Sierra Nevada mountain range and Yosemite National Park.

Modesto is located in the heart of one of the greatest agricultural areas of our nation - the San Joaquin Valley. Dairy products, almonds, apricots, melons, tomatoes, wine grapes, peaches, walnuts and poultry products are some of our top commodities. Join us in early spring to enjoy the delightful sights and smells of orchard blossoms. Visit here in the summer or fall harvest seasons and "taste Modesto" at our Farmers Market or at a roadside produce stand.

If your tastes run more to the adventurous side, there is rafting on the Stanislaus River, bike trails throughout Modesto, horseback riding at area ranches, and outdoor in-line skating or skateboarding at Modesto's newest skate park. Maybe you would rather explore our regional mall or local shopping centers, picnic in one of our many parks, visit our McHenry Museum, play a round of golf or just bask poolside in our warm sunshine. Whatever you choose, you will have the opportunity to enjoy all of the "Water, Wealth, Contentment, Health" that Modesto has to offer!

 
Moraga/Canyon TOP OF PAGE

Population: 15,852

Moraga is an upscale community located south of Orinda and Lafayette, offering a blend of fine residential areas and pastures where cattle and horses graze. Boutiques, shops, a market, and dining can be found in a small shopping center. Homes tend to be newer and are on larger pieces of property, many with stables for horses. There are condominiums and single-family homes in the expensive price range. Moraga is a pretty town with a country flavor, winding scenic trails, and home to St. Mary’s College.

 
Napa County TOP OF PAGE

The Napa Valley, heart of California's premium wine industry, is located 60 miles northeast of San Francisco. Running southeast to northwest, from the city of Napa in the south to Calistoga in the north, at its center lies St. Helena, characterized as a "cosmopolitan town of 5000." The valley is a food and wine center equal to the best of France and Italy.

The rural character of the Napa Valley is supported by the county's agricultural preserve zoning laws, which have been in effect for 30 years. Under these laws landowners are precluded from subdividing agricultural and watershed land into small parcels. These laws have been at the core of protecting this agricultural environment and the beauty of this land.

The climate of the Napa Valley is moderated to a certain extent by it's proximity to the bay and ocean. However, it has enough variety to make the yearly cycle interesting - from winter temperatures than range down into the low twenties a few nights a year, to summer afternoons that rise to over 100 degrees a few days a year.

The splendor of the environment is evident year round. Fall, with the changing colors of trees and vineyards and the excitement of the harvest, and spring when fields of golden mustard announce the beginning of a new growing cycle, are favorite seasons for visitors to the valley.

 
Oakland TOP OF PAGE

There is so much to do enjoy and do! It is a city that is often overlooked, but it offers much charm, beauty and cultural and artistic benefits often unknown to the outsider.

Oakland's weather is fabulous all year around, not too hot or humid and definitely not cold- temperate and sunny best describes the typical day. We have more artists per capita than any other American city outside of New York. Oakland is multicultural and is known to be the most integrated city in the United States, with no true ethnic majority.

Our city has many points of interest. Lake Merritt, located in the center of Oakland, provides a beautiful natural setting at the city's core. The lake is a great place to walk, jog, visit the Lakeside Horticultural Gardens, or enjoy the views. Jack London Square, at the foot of Broadway on the water is a vibrant area with fabulous restaurants, shops, a new multiplex theatre, plus a great Barnes & Noble bookstore. After shopping at the Sunday Farmers market in Jack London Square, it is only a short walk up Broadway to the city's large and thriving Chinatown. Don't miss the town's $80 million Pacific Renaissance Plaza (a huge retail center) in the center of Chinatown.

Across Broadway from Chinatown is Oakland's renovated "old town" and the newer City Center Plaza offering shops, restaurants, and free lunch concerts on a regular basis.

Oakland's different areas and neighborhoods are attractive, affordable (comparatively speaking) and varied. A home buyer can choose between a loft in the Jack London Square area, a condominium around the lake, a townhouse in the hills overlooking the Bay, or a single family home. Neighborhoods range from the traditional, established areas like Trestle Glen or a new construction in the hills with unsurpassed views of the Bay and San Francisco.

 
Oakley TOP OF PAGE

Population: 18,374

Another one of the fastest growing East Bay communities. Oakley offers many new homes at very reasonable prices. Primarily agricultural in setting, Oakley’s downtown are is a sleepy village that serves nearby farms.

 
Orinda TOP OF PAGE

Population: 16,642

The closet bedroom community to San Francisco in Contra Costa County is located on Highway 24, just over the hills from Berkeley. Orinda is comprised of older, established homes in the expensive price range. The terrain is hilly, and most home sites are large, often 1/2 acre and up, with predominantly custom ranch-style homes. Available homes are almost exclusively re-sales, although there is some new custom construction. Many homes are built on hillside lots with magnificent views.

 
Pinole TOP OF PAGE

Pinole is a quiet bedroom town In West Contra Costa County. The town begins at San Pablo Bay and travels back into the hills. Housing consists of nice neighborhoods with many good views at reasonable prices.

 
Pittsburg TOP OF PAGE

Population: 47,564

This is the first city over the opening of hills and mountains that divides Central and East County. It has doubled it’s population in the last 20 years and is still growing. Lots of parks and recreation for children and has one of the largest marinas in Northern California. BART is in the process of extending a train to East County, which will help the commute. The downtown area is being renovated with strong city support a river view to many hill homes, Pittsburg is close to Central Contra Costs and is very affordable.

 
Pleasant Hill TOP OF PAGE

Population: 31,505

Pleasant Hill is a quiet town; it boasts the site of the main county library and a new city hail. Diablo Valley College (DVC) the largest community college in the county is also located here. It boasts many parks and restaurants. The area tends to be wooded and well landscaped. Prices tend to be good for single-family resale’s, moderate for condominiums and fairly expensive for new home projects close to an 18-hole golf course in the hills. Pleasant Hill is a desirable place to live because of its central location.

 
Pleasanton TOP OF PAGE

The City of Pleasanton is a general law City operating with a City Council/City Manager form of government. This form of government, which has been widely used since its inception in 1910, provides the City with public policy direction from the City Council and professional administration from a City Manager.

The City Council is the governing body of the City. It is vested with all the regulatory and corporate powers of a municipal corporation provided by state law governing general law cities. California recognizes two classes of cities: general law cities and charter cities. About 20 percent of California's 400 cities are charter cities including most of the larger ones. These cities are governed by the provisions of their own adopted charter unless the State of California has stated specifically that its laws apply. As a general law city, Pleasanton's Council structure, planning procedure and many other aspects of local government are controlled by state law. The City does, however, maintain a Pleasanton Municipal Code which sets forth its regulations and laws. Copies of the Pleasanton Municipal Code are available for public review at the City Clerk's Office located at 123 Main Street and at the Public Library located at 400 Old Bernal.

The Pleasanton City Government provides a full range of services including those related to police and fire protection, planning and building review, road construction and maintenance, water and sewer distribution and maintains a wide range of recreational/social services through its Parks and Community Services Department.

 
Rodeo TOP OF PAGE

Rodeo is an unincorporated area with an approximate population of 6,200. Recreation faculties include Garretson Field with the Rodeo Recreation center. There is a Public Marina that provides fishing and boating facilities. Rodeo is north of Hercules and is conveniently located close to Interstate 80. There is little area left to be developed with the exception of approxlmately 9 acres on the waterfront that is being considered for condominiums and townhouses with 10 acres in that same area possibly being donated to the East Bay Regional Parks District. It Is part of the John Swett School District.

 
Sacramento County TOP OF PAGE

Nestled between the Sacramento and American Rivers, the Sacramento region has much to offer with its affordable housing, excellent schools, outstanding park systems, and its sunny, tree-lined streets.

Sacramento and the surrounding communities provide some of the lowest home prices in the state. From very affordable condominiums and cottages to expansive estates, the area has something to offer for everyone.

 
San Francisco County TOP OF PAGE

A very old city by West Coast standards, San Francisco is known for its rich and colorful history. In 1769, a Spanish land expedition led by Gaspar de Portola discovered San Francisco Bay on a trek north from Mexico. In 1775, San Juan Manuel de Ayala sailed into the bay for the first time, soon followed on land by Father Junipero Serra who built the Mission Dolores.

In 1848, California joined the Union, gold was discovered and San Francisco became world-famous as the place where fortunes could be made. In 1849, the Gold Rush began and thousands of fortune seekers-the famed '49ers-crowded into the city. In just four years, the city's population rose from about 800 in 1848 to 35,000 in 1852.

Hotels and restaurants sprang up to house the visitors who were pouring in. The city needed bankers, companies to outfit the miners, communications and transport companies. Levi Strauss made a fortune providing miners with blue jeans, while Leland Stanford, Charles Crocker, Collins P. Huntington and Mark Hopkins financed the transcontinental railroad.

The most severe challenge to the city came in 1906, when a major earthquake followed by several days of fire devastated much of San Francisco, killing 700 people and destroying some 28,000 buildings. In the years following the great quake, the city rebuilt itself making a remarkable recovery. On June 9, 1911, a group of businessmen signed an article of incorporation founding the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. Over the next 30 years, the city built a grand City Hall and Civic Center, the Hetch Hetchy Water System, the Bay and Golden Gate Bridges and the first public municipal transit system in the United States.

Today, it's rare to find a person who needs an introduction to San Francisco's charms. People residing all over the world immediately recognize the city's famous attractions: the Golden Gate Bridge, Fisherman's Wharf, Chinatown, the cable cars and the pyramid-shaped Transamerica Building.

San Francisco combines sheer physical beauty, cultural diversity, leisure and recreational offerings and an ideal climate. Today, San Francisco is the heart of the Bay Area, a nine-county major metropolitan complex with a population of more than 6.5 million, making it the fifth largest market in the nation.

 
San Joaquin County TOP OF PAGE

The San Joaquin Delta where the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers meet before entering the San Francisco Bay, is an area rich with outdoor recreation opportunities. The Delta covers over 1,000 miles of navigable rivers, streams, and canals for fishing, boating and water sports. Within 1.5 to 2.5 hours of driving time Stockton residents can visit metropolitan San Francisco, the gold country of the Mother Lode, the Sierras, Napa Wine Country, ski bowls, the state capitol, Lake Tahoe and beautiful Pacific Ocean beaches. Yosemite National Park is just 2.5 hours away.

Average residential sales prices in San Joaquin County are much lower than in the neighboring San Francisco Bay Area. Due to this fact and the easy commute, thousands of people reside in San Joaquin County and work in the San Francisco Bay area. The average residential price for a home in March of 1997 was 104,962 in Stockton, 135,885 in Lodi and 118,234 for the San Joaquin County.

 
San Leandro TOP OF PAGE

San Leandro is a friendly and diverse City with a colorful heritage and numerous cultural amenities including a 450-berth Marina, two golf courses and a large community library center. Discovered in 1772 by a Spanish explorer, San Leandro became famous during the late 1800s and early 1900s for its delicious cherries. In 1909, to celebrate the abundant cherry harvest, San Leandro held its first Cherry Festival, an event which was so successful, it is still celebrated today.

In addition to the Cherry Festival, San Leandro is also well-known for its quiet, well-defined neighborhoods full of charming and unique older houses on tree-lined streets. San Leandro residents are proud of both their neighborhoods and their City which can be seen in their active involvement in the City .s numerous neighborhood and homeowner .s associations. San Leandro .s temperate weather also makes it an excellent place for outdoor recreation. With an average temperature of 62 degrees and average rainfall of 19 inches per year, outdoor activity at the one of the many City parks is possible all year round.

 
San Ramon TOP OF PAGE

Population: 35,030

San Ramon is located in the heart of the San Ramon Valley, about 20 miles east of Oakland. It is a newly developed area far commuters from the city who prefer suburban living. Prices are in the moderate to high ranges. Bishop Ranch, the new industrial park area, is anchored by Chevron and Pacific Bell. The Market Place is a new and inviting shopping center, offering a variety of shops and services. The new Marriott Hotel in Bishop Ranch sits below the recently opened San Ramon Regional Medial Center up on the hill. Golf lovers can enjoy the public golf course at San Ramon Royal Vista Golf and Country Club, and members of Canyon Lakes and Crow Canyon County Clubs are welcome to take full advantage of the facilities there.

 
Santa Clara County TOP OF PAGE

Santa Clara County is unique because of its combination of physical attractiveness and economic diversity. With its numerous natural amenities and one of the highest standards of living in the country, the county has long been considered one of the best areas in the United States in which to live and work. The Mediterranean climate of the region remains temperate year round due to the area's geography and its proximity to the Pacific Ocean. The area is warm and dry much of the year. Santa Clara County is located at the southern end of the San Francisco Bay and encompasses 1,300 square miles. The fertile Santa Clara Valley runs the entire length of the county from north to south, ringed by the rolling hills of the Diablo Range on the east, and the Santa Cruz Mountains on the west. Salt marshes and wetlands lie in the northwestern part of the county, adjacent to the waters of San Francisco Bay.

Today, the County is a major employment center for the region, providing more than a quarter of all jobs in the Bay Area. It has one of the highest median family incomes in the country, and a wide diversity of cultures, backgrounds an talents. Santa Clara County continues to attract people from all over the world.

The county's population of over 1.6 million is the fourth largest in the state, and the largest of the nine Bay Area counties. Its population constitutes about one fourth of the Bay Area's total population. There are 15 cities and various unincorporated areas in the county ranging from Palo Alto to the north, to Gilroy in the south. San Jose is the largest city in the County, with a population of nearly 850,000, and is the administrative site of County Government.

 
Solano County TOP OF PAGE

At the northeast corner of the Bay Area stands Solano County, the crossroads of Northern California from its earliest days.

Upper Solano County, from its wild wetland marshes to its rolling Vaca Mountains; from the vast irrigated gardenland near Dixon to its Allendale ranchettes, is not just a place to live but a way of life. In a wink, anything less is second best.

It continues to fill the crossroads role today with a land route west through the wine country and on to the Pacific Ocean; major metropolitan centers of the Bay Area within 60 miles to the south; and east ward, the state capital.

There are numerous universities and colleges with in a one-hour radius of Solano County. These include the University of California at Berkeley, the U.C. Davis campus, California State University Campuses at Sacramento, San Francisco and Sonoma, and other well-known private educational institutions.

The waterway facilities are in heavy use and under continual development; and major international air ports are within reach; while military material and personnel for half the world travel via Travis Air Force Base in the center of tri-county.

Solano County measures 827 square miles with the bulk of the population residing in Vallejo, Fairfield, Suisun City, Vacaville and Benicia. Projected population growth for Solano is the highest percentage increase in the Bay Area with the 1990 figure expected to total 325,900.

 
Sonoma County TOP OF PAGE

Sonoma County - from the vineyards to the redwoods to the sea - is a beautiful and diverse place to call home. The lower Russian River runs through this region to the Pacific Ocean and Guerneville is at the center of the vacation and resort activities along the river. Other communities in the area include Bodega Bay, Forestville, Jenner, Monte Rio, Occidental, and Sebastopol. One of the attractions of this area is the small town atmosphere of all the West Sonoma County communities.

 
Sunol TOP OF PAGE

The town of Sunol, located approximately 40 miles southeast of San Francisco, California has a population of about 1,500 people. Most of these live on Kilkare Road, which winds north up Kilkare Canyon along Sinbad Creek. It is a beautiful unincorporated rural area complete with its own post office, the Sunol Glen School, the historic Niles Canyon Railway, a cafe, a general store, an antique store, a saloon, the Little Brown Church and a winery. The Pleasanton Ridge forms a line of hills above Sunol to the northeast. These hills include century-old olive groves and are protected as part of the East Bay Regional Park District ridgelands.

 
Tracy TOP OF PAGE

Once a farm town, Tracy is a thriving community within the San Joaquin County that has grown by leaps and bounds over the last ten years. Within a 30-60 minute commute to most cities in the bay area, Tracy offers home buyers an affordable alternative to more expensive communities. The average home price in Tracy was $156,954 in 1996, with new and existing homes starting in the $120s and larger 4 & 5 bedroom homes in the $160s and up.

The small-town flavor community is enhanced by its historic downtown as well as by older cottages and bungalows which can still be found around town.

Tracy has a small airport and lots of shopping, including an outlet mall. The new West Valley Mall features 5 large department stores and the largest movie theatre complex in Northern California. The new commuter rail system has been offered service since October of 1998.

Tracy is home to many young families and there is plenty of recreation here to support them. Located near the delta, Tracy has boating, swimming and fishing nearby. There is a community pool as well as library, parks, playgrounds, and a plenitude of activities for children. Tracy's ideal commute location puts it just three hours from Yosemite National Park and even closer to some ski slopes.

With an average summertime temperature of 87 degrees and a winter low of about 46 degrees Tracy's weather is typical of San Joaquin County.

 
Walnut Creek TOP OF PAGE

Population: 60,869

Per the Chronicle Newspaper, Walnut Creek, for general amenities, ranked first in the East Bay area. It is the fourth largest city in the county with great parks, shopping, theaters, museums, restaurants and night life. The newer Regional Center for the Arts with two theaters featuring plays and musicals, an art gallery and symphonies. This center has established Walnut Creek as the cultural leader in the county. It has many activities, churches, clubs, social events, plus Rossmoor, a large retirement community. Home prices are aimed at the middle and upper-middle class. It is a fairly sophisticated and very livable city.